jimhines: (Snoopy Writing)
[personal profile] jimhines

Introduction

This is the fourth chunk of data and analysis from the 2016 Novelist Income Survey.

For this part, I wanted to look at whether the hours spent on marketing, promotion, and outreach correlated at all with how much money our authors made last year.

Overview

I used net income again, which means I removed data points where the authors hadn’t reported their expenses. I also eliminated two data points where respondents said they spent over 1000 hours/week on promotion and marketing. (If I’m wrong and those two authors have been using a TARDIS, I’d ask them to email me. And also to let me borrow their TARDIS.)

This left us with data from a total of 371 authors.

I then did a bit of Excel self-teaching to figure out how to use the correlation function. (In the previous section, I simply graphed out number of books and net income, and inserted a trendline. Calculating the actual correlation is more accurate, and I’ll be doing that for the previous part as well when I do the final write-up.) Yay, learning!

A correlation of 1.0 would be a perfect positive correlation. Likewise, -1.0 would be a perfect negative correlation.

Finally, in addition to analyzing the overall data, I also broke it down by authors who were primarily indie, small press, and large press, because I had a feeling there’d be a difference there.

Overall Results

Looking at all 371 authors together gives us the following graph. The trend line suggests a slight correlation.

Marketing and Net IncomeExcel gives a correlation of 0.16. That’s a very small positive correlation. Is it a significant correlation? I’m not enough of a statistician to say for certain, but it’s on the low side.

Subgroup Results

So let’s look at the correlation scores for different groups of authors.

  • Large Press: 0.06
  • Small Press: 0.13
  • Indie: 0.36

In other words, the strongest correlation between promotion/outreach/marketing and net income is for the indie authors. Which shouldn’t really surprise anyone.

On the other end, the amount of time spent on marketing and promo had pretty much no relation to overall income for the large press authors.

Removing the millionaires increased the correlation for large press slightly, and decreased slightly for the indies. But the correlation remained noticeably stronger for indie authors than for large/small press authors.

Conclusions

Does this mean the time and money I spent last year as a large-press author traveling to signings and conventions and doing online promotion was completely wasted? Not necessarily. We’re looking at overall trends, and any individual data point might buck a given trend. (Also, correlation =/= causation. I think I’ve said that on every post so far.)

There’s also the question about how you’re spending that time. 20 hours spent standing on a street corner wearing a BUY LIBRIOMANCER! sign probably wasn’t as effective as 20 hours spent researching reviewers and sending out targeted review copies of my book.

That said, I think the data supports the general wisdom that if you’re self-published, it’s a lot more important to spend time on marketing and promotion. Whereas if you’re with a large press, there’s a good chance your marketing efforts won’t have much of an impact on your bottom line.

Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

jesse_the_k: amazed Alanna (hero of Staples/Vaughn SAGA comic) (alanna is amazed)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k

The Bottle Boys make beautiful music using found instruments:

  • Melodies from blowing across beer bottles (in 10-packs, carefully tuned) and
  • Percussion from shaking pop bottles full of rocks and beating a large, empty carboy.

You can see the many instrumental pop songs they’ve covered at

www.bottleboys.com

Combine that with a quartet of three violin & a cello and you’ve got this video:

Stings Strings & Bottles )

[description: All players are white, blond, male Danes. Additional melodies come from

  • a glass harmonica of wine glasses, their rims excited by chopsticks, finger tips, and violin bows
  • an alto pan pipe of test-tubes
  • a tenor pan pipe of wine bottles
  • a bass pan pipe of growlers
  • inserting fingers in bottle neck and swiftly popping them

Percussion includes

  • hand slapping chest
  • hands & chopsticks on the cello
  • a wee plastic egg full of rice]

Sorry for being cryptic

Feb. 23rd, 2017 04:54 pm
hollymath: (Default)
[personal profile] hollymath
Sometimes the word "friend" feels really inadequate when you're poly.

Sometimes something happens to someone close to you and there are people you can't tell, or at least you can't tell them how excited or devastated you are at whatever kind of a thing it is (they've won an award, they have a serious illness, whatever) because you're not out, or they're not out. Or maybe because you wouldn't use a word like partner for them...but friend isn't enough, either.

We don't have the vocabulary.

And when it's a happy thing you're affected by, this might seem less of a problem because at least you're happy. When it's a sad thing, it seems extra sad that you can't even explain why you're so sad.

Croydon Fun Weekend 2018

Feb. 23rd, 2017 04:43 pm
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
[personal profile] nou

Just a quick heads-up that, after a year off in 2017, the Croydon Fun Weekend will be back in 2018, running from Friday 26 January to Sunday 28 January.

I’ll provide more details closer to the time; but in the meantime, if you’re interested in helping to organise the weekend or in running any sessions, please let me know! For an idea of the sort of things that might be included, see programmes from previous years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

oursin: Books stacked on shelves, piled up on floor, rocking chair in foreground (books)
[personal profile] oursin

I was given to think, if not very much, by this article which floated past my attention lately: If you want to get smarter, speed-reading is worse than not reading at all.

I assume he's talking about people who follow some programme that is intended to increase their natural reading speed, rather than people whose natural speed of reading is fairly quick (Frankie Howerd voice going 'Don't Mock' at his boast of reading 100 books in a year).

It is unlikely that readers will be able to double or triple their reading speeds (e.g., from around 250 to 500–750 words per minute) while still being able to understand the text as well as if they read at normal speed.”

If you’re reading fast, you’re not engaging in critical thinking. You’re not making connections between Infinite Jest and other post-modern texts; you’re not challenging a historian’s version of the American Revolution. You’re not having a conversation with the author. And if you’re not doing the work, you’re only walking away with surface knowledge.

Oh no? Begging to differ there. There is no 'normal' speed across the board: there is the speed that is normal for the individual reader.

Related, at least by a rather random process of association, In praise of readability, which is engaging with this rather problematic piece Against Readability (query: are not invocations of 'soap-opera' and 'middlebrow' gendered dog-whistles?), which is one of those 'god forbid readers should enjoy themselves' pieces.

nancylebov: (green leaves)
[personal profile] nancylebov
Richard Stallman ordered a button from me-- the top half had blue writing on white which said BLUE LIES MATTER*, the bottom half had black writing on yellow "Prosecute Perjury", and the whole thing had a red ring around the edge to make it more eye-catching.

What could possibly go wrong?

He wore it to Boskone, and several people saw it as being about lies from Democrats.

I considered redoing it with "Prosecute Police Perjury". However, most police lies aren't in court and therefore aren't committing perjury.

Please discuss this at DW/LJ, not on Facebook.


*read it carefully, there's a gotcha

Terry Pratchett Exhibition

Feb. 23rd, 2017 11:16 am
green_knight: (Fieldwork)
[personal profile] green_knight
I'm mainly posting the link here so I have a better chance of remembering it in September: I wanna go.


http://www.thebookseller.com/news/exhibition-dedicated-sir-terry-pratchett-inspires-flurry-flights-across-world-493771
starlady: (bibliophile)
[personal profile] starlady
What I'm Reading 
I'm separately slogging through Queens' Play, the second Lymond book, and have just started the third Jaran book by Kate Elliott, An Earthly Crown. I am enjoying the Jaran books so far but they are quite…long…and I am less engrossed in them than in any other Kate Elliott book I have ever read. Otoh, I did, after finishing the first one, finally obtain a Kate Elliott backlist bingo. I am also engrossed in Lymond, but I don't know what is going to take the last 125 pages of this book and the plot seems to have temporarily becalmed, which is saying something for a book in which Lymond mostly drinks and fucks his way through the French court in disguise (the latter of which is, of course, offscreen). I have at least managed to internalize that whenever a character is doing something and I don't understand why, it's because they want to fuck Lymond. I hope, but doubt, that the upcoming TV series will make some of this rather unsubtle subtext visible onscreen.

What I've Just Read
Well, Jaran 1 and 2 and Lymond 1. Jaran 1 and 2: good, long, I have no idea how Gwyn Jones gets from Point A in book 2 to where he winds up at the beginning of the Highroad trilogy, which at least does not have the problem of not much happening for long stretches of time. Lymond 1: every man in Scotland is an idiot except Lymond, and Will Scott at the critical moment. I felt like I was being beaten over the head by Scottish history for most of it, but in an enjoyable way. I have been texting [personal profile] oliviacirce about the books, because she told me to, and at some point I will probably transcribe our conversations with her permission, because they are at least hilarious.

What I'll Read Next

You guessed it…Jaran 4. I would also say Lymond 3, but apparently it's best not to break between books 3-6 and my copy of 4 is the wrong edition, so I may hold off until I can solve that problem. Also I have a pile of comics that I need to read before ECCC.
sorcyress: Just a picture of my eye (Me-Eye)
[personal profile] sorcyress
Trigger Warning: Rape and emotional abuse talk. Happy anniversary! :p

So I guess I should talk about it.

Ten years ago today, I started dating kSatyr. Officially like, with the whole "will you be my boyfriend/girlfriend" conversation. Things were...already not good in some ways. I don't have good notes from that far back. (I don't have any notes from late August to early December, because that was the hard drive that died and the diary that disappeared and oh I miss it I miss it so.)

I don't think he'd raped me yet, at that point. I know I was already dealing with his whinging, demanding, broken-brained manipulation and emotional abuse. I have no excuse for it, I never have really, except that he had a desperate all-encompassing clinging need which only I could fill, and I was too young to know that's not attractive.

It was years after we broke up before I ever heard the line "don't set yourself on fire to keep other people warm".

I hope he's figured out how to fix himself, in the time since. Goddess knows how much effort I've put into the trick. I'd be surprised if he wasn't willing to put in the same, except this was a man twice my age who acted decades younger than me, so actually, I wouldn't be surprised at all.

I wonder sometimes what narrative he tells himself about how it all went down. I wonder if he knows he raped me --I know it would kill him to hear me say it. Good. Let my truth choke him. I haven't even tried looking at his livejournal since I got Kela --and that's been, gosh, more'n three years.

(After we broke up, he told me I had to defriend him, and that I had to make all my posts friends-locked. I told him I wanted to keep writing publicly, that sometimes I have people reading my journal without accounts of their own (Hi Tailsteak!). He told me if I wouldn't acquiesce, he'd tell my mom how far we'd gotten, you know, sexually.

I called his fucking bluff. And eventually, I did unfriend him. I don't know when he stopped reading my journal. The last time I ever talked to him was in 2011. The last time I ever _will_ talk to him was in 2011.)

A lot of this has already been gone over, exhaustively, in TherapyFilter. Or more exhaustively in BehindtheWalls versions 2.0 and 2.1, and in thousands and thousands of my 750words. I have written _a lot_ about kSatyr, and the damages he left behind.

I don't really feel damaged today. Just tired.

In nine months and ten days, it will be December 2nd. It will be the ten year anniversary of being free from him. (Nevermind the hooks that took another year and more to pull out. Nevermind the four years before I could again hold Emily in my arms. Nevermind the scars on my mind that will never totally go away, because this is always going to be a part of me.). I am planning to celebrate that day. I will let my friends know if they can be a part of it.

Be good to each other. We're all we have in this world.

~Sor
MOOP!

Trigger Warning: Rape and emotional abuse talk. Happy anniversary! :p
sonia: Quilted wall-hanging (Default)
[personal profile] sonia
Why Does Dating Men Make Me Feel Like Shit? by Emma Lindsay
Usually instead of saying “I am turned on by that woman,” a man will say “that woman is hot.” The first phrasing places the locus of control within his own body (aka, in a way, making it “his fault” if he gets turned on), the second phrasing places the locus of control within the woman’s body (making it “her fault” if he gets turned on.)


This article explains rape culture. Men locate control of their sexual feelings in women instead of themselves because they feel ashamed. Wow. I've noticed the shame, but never understood it this clearly.

Two Great Vids from the Festivids

Feb. 22nd, 2017 03:51 pm
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Vidding defined )

Although the annual Festivids discussion and commenting happen on Dreamwidth (mirrored on Livejournal, Tumblr, IRC and so forth), the vids themselves are posted in many places. In my brief experience, the most lasting is Festivids' own site.

For now, all the 2016 Festivids are here
http://fv-poster.dreamwidth.org/336383.html

and for the future, visit
http://www.festivids.net/festivids/festivids-2016

The two highlights for me: A Better Son/Daughter and Get Better )

Three notes on US politics

Feb. 22nd, 2017 01:12 pm
monanotlisa: (hijabmerica - resist)
[personal profile] monanotlisa
I've tagged this post; on Dreamwidth you can filter -- either for or against a tag.

1. I've looked around for a summary with facts and figures for the calculated plan to profit off deportations of immigrants, versus photo collages of unclear origin or unsourced information (note, I never doubted the truth of, say, US Uncut's claim; all I want is evidence). I know it's more of a tabloid, but I'm thankful to Salon for this piece. It provides a great pivot:

President Trump’s plan to round up the undocumented will be wonderful for private prisons

2. As I discussed yesterday with one of the people I met at a Silicon Valley - type gathering, US Republicans' inactivity now is easily explained. After all the Republicans have, for decades, tried to limit access to anyone not White and Wealthy -- access to education, access to the already-patchy welfare net, and of course access to voting:

Do voter identification laws suppress minority voting? Yes. We did the research. (WP)

3. Many people have weighed in on The Milo Issue (I refuse to learn how to even spell his last name). The folks reading this blog likely all agree on a few things: that it's sad it took claims of pedophilia to finally look harder at this real-life troll; that he exemplifies how in the eyes of conservatives women, trans people, and immigrants are not worth protecting; that Simon & Schuster dropping him now proves the matter was never about Free Speech after all, but *content* that conservatives found appealing...or not so. But I'll bring up an article that adds what I've privately thought: that his substantive comments in this instance were so personal as to not be particularly disturbing, except of course they were in these United States and their discourse:

What we'll tolerate, and what we won't. (currentaffairs.org)
jack: (Default)
[personal profile] jack
I was reflecting further on my previous comments on meta-history in source control.

One use case I imagined was that you can rebase freely, and people who've pulled will have everything just work assuming they always pull rebase. But I may have been too pessimistic. A normal pull rebase may usually just cope with the sort of rebasing people are likely to have done upstream anyway.

The other question is, are you losing old history by rebasing older commits? Well, I don't suggest doing it for very old commits, but I guess, you're not losing any history for commits that were in releases.

Although that itself raises a reason to have a connection between the new branch and the old: you shouldn't be rebasing history prior to a release much (usually not at all. maybe to squash a commit to make git bisect work?) But if you do, you don't want too parallel branches with the same commit, you want to be able to see where the release was on the "good" history (assuming there's a commit which is file-identical to the original release commit), and fall back to the "original" history only if there's some problem.

And as I've said before, another thing I like is the idea that if you're rebasing, you don't have a command that says "do this whole magic thing in one step", you have a thing that says "construct a new branch one commit at a time from this existing branch, stopping when there's a problem", and there is no state needed to continue after resolving a problem, you just re-run the command on the partially-constructed new branch. And then can choose to throw away the old branch to tidy up, but that's not an inherent part of the commadn.

Narnia fanfic

Feb. 22nd, 2017 12:26 pm
rachelmanija: (Default)
[personal profile] rachelmanija
For the Chocolate Box exchange, which focuses on romantic or friendship pairings, I wrote The Gift for [personal profile] aurilly's request for Emeth/Tirian from The Last Battle. If you don't remember him, Emeth was the honorable young Calormene officer, who made a disproportionate impression in a very brief appearance, at least on those of us who like noble warriors.

Reading Wednesday

Feb. 22nd, 2017 07:37 pm
rmc28: Rachel standing in front of the entrance to the London Eye pier (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
What I've read: poetry
[personal profile] serene mentioned the poem-a-day email from Rattle and I signed up. I don't really feel I know or understand poetry very much, but these ones have stuck with me so far:
Shoveling Snow by Vicki L. Wilson
April Rain by Abigail Rose Cargo


What I've read: short fiction
I also recently subscribed to Daily Science Fiction which gets me a short story in my email on weekdays, so even if I'm not getting to anything else, I usually manage to read that.

Shop Talk by O. Hybridity
Grandma Heloise by KT Wagner
An Invasion in Seven Courses by Rene Sears

Two more novellas from the historical romance collection Gambled Away:
Raising the Stakes by Isabel Cooper: A 1930s con-artist accidentally summons elvish help when she wins a flute in a poker game; he helps her pull off a really big con.
Redeemed by Molly O'Keefe: A former army doctor and a former spy, brought together by a really nasty character and a high-stakes poker-game in the aftermath of the US Civil War.



Acquisitions: (so far entirely eyes-bigger-than-stomach-brain)
  • Daring Greatly by Brene Brown
  • Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor - sequel to Binti which I enjoyed very much
  • Stories of Your Life and Others - anthology by Ted Chiang, including Story of Your Life, which has been made into the film Arrival
  • The Good Immigrant - anthology of essays by twenty British Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic writers and artists, includes this one by Riz Ahmed (played Bodhi Rook, the defecting cargo pilot in Star Wars: Rogue One; also as Riz MC was one of the artists on Immigrants (We Get The Job Done) - my favourite track from the Hamilton Mixtape)
  • Journeys - anthology of short fantasy stories

Birthday greetings and felicitations

Feb. 22nd, 2017 09:23 am
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 to [personal profile] emceeaich !  Happy (and dry!) day!  
hollymath: (Default)
[personal profile] hollymath
Another e-mail I've had from Citizens UK that it will do me no good to send to my own MP, some of you might find it worthwhile though:
Tomorrow MPs will debate the Dubs Scheme in Parliament. This is the Government’s chance to do the right thing.

Email your MP and ask them to attend the debate.

For two weeks our voices have been loud and clear - from Rowan Williams to Keira Knightly to Birmingham City Council, from Aberdeen to Hammersmith - we have sent a clear message: Britain is better than this.

And we know the Government can hear us - just this weekend Theresa May agreed to review the claims of 400 refugee children. Already we have made a huge difference. But we can win bigger than this.

We need to get every single MP we can in the chamber tomorrow.


Together, if we urge our representatives to show up, we can create more pressure than ever before.
Email your MP now to ask them to go to the debate and tell the Government to keep the Dubs Scheme open.
oursin: Photograph of small impressionistic metal figurine seated reading a book (Reader)
[personal profile] oursin

What I read

I finished Truth is not sober, and while a lot of these stories were clearly responding to particular issues of the time, at which some worked better than others as actual stories for the ages, there was something very delightful indeed about coming across a trove of Holtby's fiction that I hadn't already read.

JA Jance, Judgement Call (2012) - clearly I've been falling behind on the Joanna Brady mysteries, because I discovered 2 I hadn't read available in ebook and one crossover with another of her series characters that I don't much care for. I'd forgotten how good they are, or maybe this was a particularly strong one.

Ellen Klages, Passing Strange (2017) - ok, it is a novella, but I thought this was a little on the slight side, might be just me.

On the go

Still trucking on with the massive Inchbald biography, which is perhaps a little close focus, but does do a good job of embedding her in her wider theatrical milieu.

In spite of Kobo's claim that I had cancelled my pre-order (on the very morning it was due to be available WOT) I have acquired KJ Charles, An Unseen Attraction and am about partway through. Just possibly the author is being a tad presentist in the characters' expressed distaste for the excesses of Victorian taxidermy - kittens stuffed and doing the sorts of things they do in Louis Wain paintings, etc?

I was also recommended (I think via [personal profile] coffeeandink, an ongoing WIP original fiction on AO3 'The Course of Honour' by Avoliot, which is charming.

Up next

Well, there's another JA Jance sitting on my ereader, plus the various Flashmans I inherited, and I'm tempted to see to what extent John Masters' Far, Far the Mountain Peak (1957), which was probably my personal favourite of his Savage family sequence, holds up.

Interesting Links for 22-02-2017

Feb. 22nd, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker

(no subject)

Feb. 22nd, 2017 09:13 am
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] laura_anne!

In Memoriam

Feb. 21st, 2017 11:30 pm
onyxlynx: Some trees and a fountain at a cemetery (A Fine and Private Place)
[personal profile] onyxlynx

self care trivia

Feb. 21st, 2017 06:40 pm
alatefeline: Painting of a cat asleep on a book. (Default)
[personal profile] alatefeline
Things that make things better, and which I should remember to make use of…

Potentially chore-like...Read more... )
ceb: (blossom)
[personal profile] ceb
Writing to peers is a bit of a faff. Well, the writing bit less so, working out who to write to is the faff.

http://www.stilleu.uk/lobby-lords-brexit-bill/ is the best source of suggestions for what to write. It also has information on how to choose who to write to.

Write to a specific lord (search by name) here: https://www.theyworkforyou.com/peers/
Or use https://www.writetothem.com/lords to search by other factors - e.g. words they have mentioned in debate, or connections to a location. The other benefit of this is that you can check whether a given peer is someone who turns up to debates or not.
These both limit you to 6 emails a day (the rationale being that above that, messages will be dismissed as spam). Many peers use the general House of Commons email address and this is a convenient way to email them. The form will put in the correct form of address for you.

However, using https://www.theyworkforyou.com/peers/ you can look up email addresses, and if you find peers listing a different address, not just the HoL one, you can email them separately at that address.
http://www.parliament.uk/business/lords/whos-in-the-house-of-lords/how-to-address-a-lord/ for how to get the form of address right (NB that's Dear Lady Mobarik, frex, not Dear Lady Baroness Mobarik, not completely clear from that article).

In addition, the following are members of the government so subject to whip, and so may be less useful to write to:
Baroness Neville-Rolfe (Treasury), Baroness Williams of Trafford (HO), Baroness Joanna Shields (HO), Baroness Anelay of St Johns (FCO), Lord Keen of Elie (MoJ), Lord Nash (Education), Lord Bridges of Headley (ExEU), Lord Prior of Brampton (BIS), Lord O'Shaughnessy (Health), Lord Henley (DWP), Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Transport), Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (DCLG), Baroness Evans of Bowes Park, Lord Dunlop (Scotland), Lord Gardiner of Kimble (Biosecurity), Lord Bates (int dev), Lord Ashton of Hyde (cult), Lord Taylor of Holbeach, Earl of Courtown, Baroness Mobarik, Viscount Younger of Leckie, Lord Young of Cookham, Baroness Goldie, Baroness Buscombe, Baroness Vere of Norbiton, Lord O'Shaughnessy (all whips)

Other useful links:
https://www.crowdjustice.org/case/parliament-take-control/ "Case updates" has ideas and material they've sent to all the Lords and previous stuff they sent to MPs
https://www.bindmans.com/uploads/files/documents/UK_Parliament_EU_Citizenship_rights_booklet.pdf
http://www.crossbenchpeers.org.uk/interests.html
http://lordsoftheblog.net/

Hippo, Birdie, Two Ewes

Feb. 21st, 2017 03:20 pm
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
 to [personal profile] stonebender  and [personal profile] davidlevine !  Stay dry!  (Best wishes for a happy day.)
vatine: books-related stuff (books)
[personal profile] vatine
Previously unread.

This is technically a novella. At least that's what the metadata says. It is eminently readable, no matter what category of "size of work" it happens to fall in. Not exactly sure what to say about it, but the term "slow bullet" is in many ways highly plot-relevant. And anything else would probably be spoilery.

Dear Fandom5K Author

Feb. 21st, 2017 04:51 pm
slashmarks: (Leo)
[personal profile] slashmarks
Placeholder post, will be filled by March 3.

Quick Short Story Rec

Feb. 21st, 2017 11:24 am
forestofglory: E. H. Shepard drawing of Christopher Robin reading a book to Pooh (Default)
[personal profile] forestofglory
I've finally started reading some 2017 short fiction (it only took an month an a half). I quite enjoyed "Microbiota and the Masses: A Love Story" by S.B. Divya Its a sweet story that features microbiology and ecological remediation. Anyways its nice to feel a bit less rushed about my short fiction reading.
oursin: Julia Margaret Cameron photograph of Hypatia (Hypatia)
[personal profile] oursin

Intriguing article in Sunday's Observer which tries to get beyond the knee-jerk shock horror that there has been a demand at SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London) for the philosophy course to be a bit less dead and white - Are Soas students right to ‘decolonise’ their minds from western philosophers? - even if 'male' still seems to be the default, except for passing mentions of Hannah Arendt, one of which alludes to her as one of several influenced by Heidegger.

And I am all for being less Eurocentric, or at least considering the ways in which its being the occupation of dead white elite males affected the development of philosophy as it is taught in Institutionz of Highah Learninz, and what counts as 'philosophy' -

But I think there are questions there are who does it and what counts as part of the tradition and the canon -

- matters that I have given some thought to in other realms of endeavour, and, of course, bearing in mind the Russ cases as shown forth in How to Suppress Women's Writing of how, if a woman does achieve something, it Doesn't Really Count and it is off in its own separate (and inferior) category.

And thinking of the tendency to the construction of patriarchal genealogies of [intellectual/cultural fields] leaving out those women who were there when it was new and uninstitutionalised (Patricia Fara also pointed out the importance of non-elite male artisans and craftsmen to the Great Men of Science Making Big Important Discoveries: which is not even massively Back Then, see 'Norman Heatley was done out of the Nobel' because he was the lab assistant).

nancylebov: (green leaves)
[personal profile] nancylebov
Daryl Davis is a black man who befriends KKK members, starting from a premise of trying to understand how people can hate him without knowing him, and also meeting people where they are.

He's got about 30 KKK robes which were given to him by people who left the KKK.

There's been a book by him for a while, but now there's a movie, available on the PBS site until 2/28.

Do *not* watch it at Film Lush, they're scammers.

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/videos/accidental-courtesy/
theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

So as someone with a few published novels under his belt, I get asked all the time: “How do I become a professional writer?” As in, “How do I make writing my full-time job?”

The most surprising component to that is this:

Make sure Obamacare doesn’t get repealed.

Seriously.  Being a full-time writer, at least on the lower levels, is being eternally on the hustle: working your Patreon, mixing up self-publishing and traditional publishing to see which earns you more income, waiting those dry months between paychecks because publishers pay you when they damn well feel like it and acceptances can take forever.

It’s a tenuous existence at best for most writers.  For every Neil Gaiman millionaire, there’s a hundred “pro” writers scraping by on a $400-a-month Patreon and sporadic book advances.  The life of a creator is hard.

And if they go to the hospital even once without insurance, well, that’s usually enough to tip them out of this writing career business.  They literally can’t afford to write, because even trivial health issues cost them thousands of bucks they don’t have.

So they get day jobs for the steadier income.  Or they get day jobs because the insurance they can afford on their individual writer’s income is way too expensive.

Obamacare, for all its manifest flaws, let artists flourish.  America’s supposed to value the small businessman, and allowing an artist to go out and start their own jewelry company, or their publishing company, or their recording business is the height of the values Republicans usually claim to espouse.

Every artist who goes full time is an entrepreneur taking a risk.

And without affordable health care, without the BS of being barred for preexisting conditions, or being asked to pay out of some nebulous savings account that won’t cover your first major surgery?

Your chances of being a full-time author are only as good as your health.  And your health is always a crapshoot.  You can work out all day and still get hit by a car.

Maybe you can make it if you’ve got a partner who’s willing to cover for you.  Yet even that risks putting you into an abusive relationship where some jerk of a lover can mistreat you because they know you need the health care.  (That’s not theoretical, by the way.  I’ve seen that happen.  Multiple times.)

So if you want to be a full-time writer, the usual caveats apply: write a lot, because you need to learn your craft and you can’t do that by writing once a month when you’re inspired.  Get good feedback from honest people who like the kind of stuff you’re trying to write.  Submit everywhere, and dance that tricky flamenco of “changing your work in response to good criticism” without “selling out the things you love about yourself.”

But honestly?  If your dream is to be a full-time writer, call your Congressmen and tell them you want a health care program that protects all preexisting conditions, that isn’t a savings account, that doesn’t have lifetime payout limits.  I’ve written up how to do that here, and it takes about ten minutes out of your day.

And if you don’t want to be a full-time writer, but you enjoy all that great writing and indie music and Etsy art, contemplate also making the call.  A lot more artists than you’d think depend on Obamacare to keep producing that work you love, and if that gets repealed they’re going to have to quit this to get a day job.

Obamacare protects a lot more small business people than anyone wants to admit.  We just don’t talk about that because we don’t think of artists as business people – but they are.  They’re hustlers.  They’re working to survive.

Help ’em out by making a call or two.

 

 

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

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[personal profile] hatam_soferet
The Book-dragon does not hoard gold, but rather books.

They're rare, because the egg has to be incubated for a period of years, but as soon as it hatches, the larva needs access to books. This means the egg basically needs to be in a display case in a library, or in a museum that also has a book collection. Preferably in one with a dome on top, for some reason.

In the larval stage, it resembles a cranky librarian.

Over time, it gets scalier and crustier, and it develops a long tail, in which it wraps itself whilst thinking about books.

There was one at the Bodleian, at the Radcliffe Camera, whose name was "Yiddish," and it would sit on the desk, wrap itself in its tail, flash all its teeth at people, and then give advice. That was quite a young specimen. They get larger as they grow older, and more territorial.

Copyright libraries are examples of successful book-dragon hoarding. Under the copyright library, in the long-term stacks, the mature of the species is to be found, among enormous quantities of books that will never be read. The portion of the holdings accessible to readers is the bit the dragon puts out for bait; a successful library is able to build extensive collections.

The Vatican Library has a particularly old-established dragon with the most varied and valuable hoard in the world. This may be the alpha dragon of the species.

Sometimes the dragons get vicious. The Library of Alexandria had to be burned because the dragon whose hoard it was had gone bad, and there was no other way to contain the damage. The library of the Jewish Theological Seminary is ostensibly being torn down and replaced because of Manhattan real estate, but it's actually because they suspect a feral dragon, and the damage is less if you catch them early.

Soundbite

Miscellaneous. Eclectic. Random. Perhaps markedly literate, or at least suffering from the compulsion to read any text that presents itself, including cereal boxes.

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